Bad Ass Moms

The moment I become a mom I felt like I had made it to the top, then I came back from the hospital with a hungry, screaming, pooping machine. I looked like shit, I smelled even worst and I was pretty convinced I would not make it through the night; I’m happy to report back, 10 years later, I am alive, showered and somewhat mentally stable.

Being a mother, so far, has been the best and most fulfilling job/career/racket/diversion/horror-comedy show I have been in charge of. I love my kids; I love nurturing them. I love having a family.

Unlike Ivanka T., mommy survival mode to me has nothing to do with not having enough time to meditate or treat myself to a massage, but rather it reflects the constant state of chaos I live in as a working mom, burning the candle at both ends just hoping to make it all work.

Let’s give a shout to all the bad-ass mothers who don’t have millions under their mattresses, or a butler to make sure their every need is met along with their children’s. The ones who are just trying to raise good (clean) humans and make it from one day to the next in one piece. And the ones hoping that the folks in Washington will finally have our backs.

Once we are done shouting, lets cook a nice brunch for mom. I suggest a frittata.

The frittata is to Italy as the omelet is to France and just as much an art form. Every Italian family has its own recipe and masterful way of turn it. My mom made a great soufflé-like frittata by adding stiffly beaten egg whites, and she turned it on a large lid over the sink without ever breaking it. When turning my version of her frittata, I prefer to use a large plate and turn it by firmly holding the pan and the plate together with two hands and then quickly inverting both. Once the frittata is turned, I gently place it back in the pan and cook for a couple minutes more.

When I want to impress and am seeking extra height on my frittata, I don’t invert it. I finish it in the oven instead. You can also use a special double frittata pan. (Once, on a long overnight trip to Paris to visit family, my father, tired of my brothers and me quarrelling, produced one of these and swiftly but not so gently hit us over our heads. We were quiet the whole remainder of the trip. The pan was a gift for my relatives, or so he told us.)

I call this frittata No-Fear Soufflé because the texture is light and fluffy, and it can rise pretty high after the egg whites are folded in. It makes a lovely present for Mother’s Day when presented in a cast-iron pan, sprinkled with edible flowers and accompanied by a green salad and a sizable hug. #RESIST

photo by silvia baldini

No Fear Soufflé-Like Herbed Frittata
Print Recipe
Recipe by Silvia Baldini
Servings Prep Time
4 people 15 minutes
Cook Time
15/20 minutes total
Servings Prep Time
4 people 15 minutes
Cook Time
15/20 minutes total
No Fear Soufflé-Like Herbed Frittata
Print Recipe
Recipe by Silvia Baldini
Servings Prep Time
4 people 15 minutes
Cook Time
15/20 minutes total
Servings Prep Time
4 people 15 minutes
Cook Time
15/20 minutes total
Ingredients
  • 4 large organic eggs
  • 4 large organic eggs whites
  • 1/2 cups grated parmesan
  • 1/4 cups heavy cream
  • 1 cup parsley, finely chopped
  • salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 pinch freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon white vinegar
  • light olive oil
Servings: people
Units:
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. In a large metal bowl, whisk the 4 eggs. Add the Parmesan, heavy cream, parsley, and salt and pepper to taste. Add the nutmeg and mix well. In a large metal bowl, beat the eggs whites with a small pinch of salt and the vinegar until they form stiff peaks. Slowly fold the whites into the frittata mixture.
  2. Heat a seasoned medium cast-iron pan or nonstick pan over high and add enough oil to coat the bottom, then lower to medium. Gently pour the frittata mixture into the pan, lower the flame, and cook until the frittata doesn’t stick to the bottom, about 7 to 10 minutes. Finish the frittata in the oven, 5 to 10 minutes. The center should still be a little creamy. Serve immediately to a happy mom.
Recipe Notes

Tips:

  • If you are using a cast-iron pan, make sure to rub it with 1 cup kitchen salt and 4 tbsp oil. I also use a paper towel to rub the bottom of the pan in circular motions. This helps seal the pan and make it nonstick. Throw out the paper towel and salt mixture when you’re done.
  • You can use 4 individual ramekins. Make sure to grease the sides well and coat with parmesan.
  • Folding is a simple technique. The goal is to preserve the air you worked so hard to produce by beating the eggs. Chef Franc at Le Cordon Bleu taught me to first spoon a small amount of egg whites into the mixture and beat vigorously to combine the molecules and even out the texture, then gently fold the rest of the whites in with a rubber spatula in 3 batches. If you really want to be precise and make sure the mixture is well combined, you can slowly turn the mixture from one bowl to the other and keep folding, repeating this process at least twice. It sounds like a lot of work, but moms deserve it and will appreciate the effort.

 

Variations:

Anything you have in your fridge will make a great frittata add-in. Some ideas and traditional variations:
Cubed Fontina Cheese and Ham
Four Cheeses
Sautéed Zucchini
Caramelized Onions
Cooked Spinach
Herbs
Leftover Spaghetti (a kids’ favorite)
Pancetta and Peas

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